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World of Scouting Museum
Valley Forge, PA
Display Piece, 1912
Wolf & Company
Philadelphia, PA
Gift of Paul W. Ware
2007.8.120
Display Piece, 1912
Wolf & Company, 
Philadelphia, PA
Display Piece, 1912
Wolf & Company, 
Philadelphia, PA
Magazine Ad, 1920
By Wm. Andrew Loomis, 
Chicago, IL
Magazine Ad, 1920
By Wm. Andrew Loomis, 
Chicago, IL
Magazine Ad, 1920
By Wm. Andrew Loomis, 
Chicago, IL
Since 1916, the Boy Scouts of America has held a Congressional charter which grants the BSA complete control over the organization's symbols, insignia, the words "Boy Scout" and "Scouts," and the Scout image.

The BSA sought control of their image in response to misuse of it in advetising. As the Scouting movement expanded, retailers realized the marketability of using the Boy Scout name or images of Boy Scouts on their products. But not all of these products were things that the BSA wanted Scouting to be associated with.

Such an example is seen here. The BSA certainly did not want the image of a Boy Scout being used to sell tobacco, a product which young Scouts were encouraged to avoid. After the 1916 charter, the BSA would have sued the manufacturer to cease such ads.

Magazine Advertisement, 1920
By William Andrew Loomis
Chicago, IL
Gift of Jean Harlow in memory of George Harlow
2013.8.1
This magazine advertisement was considered an acceptable use of the Boy Scout image. Here a patrol sets out on a hike, presumably after eating a hearty breakfast of Kellogg's Shredded Crumbles, a popular cereal in the 1920's. If Kellogg's Crumbles could fill young Scouts with "vim and vigor," presumably it could do the same for you.
Display Piece, c.1935
M.B. Larkin Company
St. Louis, MO
Gift of Paul W. Ware
2007.8.94
In the early years of Scouting, boys wore whatever shoes or boots they owned. It wasn't long before shoe companies vied for the opportunity to make shoes for the BSA. One of the first companies to do so was the Joseph M. Herman Company which made shoes for the United States Army. Later, Douglas, Excelsior and Buster Brown were awarded contracts.

This large, free standing, display piece bears the Official Seal of the BSA, designating Buster Brown as an authorized manufacturer.
Display Piece, 1929
Printer Unknown
U.S.A.
Gift of Paul W. Ware
2007.5.8

No Boy Scout would want to be found without a pocket knife. A trusty tool for more than just cutting, his knife might also contain a can opener, bottle opener, screwdriver, scissors, and file. Official knives were etched with the BSA Seal on the blade. Handles were made of wood, bone, pearl, and metal and might bear decoratively engraved cartouches. 

The Remington Arms Company was founded in 1816 by Eliphalet Remington in Ilion, New York, under the name of E. Remington and Sons. Today, it is the oldest company in the United States which still makes its original product and is the oldest continuously operating manufacturer in North America. It is also the only U.S. company which produces both firearms and ammunition domestically and is the largest U.S. producer of shotguns and rifles.

After expanding their manufacturing capacity during World War I, Remington began to branch out into new fields, including the cutlery business (pocket and hunting knives), household utensils, and cash registers.